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Dick H., Mulholland J. The politics of corruption in Indonesia. Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. 2016. Vol. 17. Iss. 1. Pp. 43-49.
Erb M. Talk of corruption in eastern Indonesian communities: reactions to local government in the post-Suharto reform era. Journal of Social Science. 2011. Vol. 39. Iss. 2. Pp. 171-195.
Ganie-Rochman M., Achman R. Corruption in Indonesia’s emerging democracy. Journal of Developing Societies. 2016. Vol. 32. Iss. 2. Pp. 159-177.
Hamid A. A family matter: political corruption in Banten, Indonesia. Asian Politics & Policy. 2014. Vol. 6. Iss. 4. Pp. 577-593.
Hamolton-Hart N. Anti-corruption strategies in Indonesia. Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies. 2001. Vol. 37. Iss. 1. Pp. 65-82.

During 1999–2000 Indonesia pursued many anti-corruption reforms but appeared to achieve little success in reducing the level of corruption, which remained a high profile problem in all branches of government. This article summarises the reform initiatives carried out since 1998 and offers an explanation for their very limited success. Obstacles to reducing corruption in Indonesia include the economic and political constraints facing the current government and the entrenched nature of corruption. The content of the reform program itself may also contribute to the per- sistence of the problem. The program consists primarily of moves to introduce moni- toring and sanctioning mechanisms that are external to particular government organisations. Internal reforms that aim to improve organisational self-discipline have received much less attention. The reform program may thus be inherently incomplete. 

Henderson J.V., Kuncoro A. Corruption and local democratization in Indonesia: the role of Islamic parties. Journal of Development Economics. 2011. Vol. 94. Iss. 2. Pp. 164-180.

Indonesia has a tradition of corruption among local officials who harass and collect bribes from firms. This paper examines whether corruption is affected by a change in institutions introducing local democratization and by party composition of local assemblies. Democratization occurred in 1999 and decentralization in 2001. We have firm-level data for 2001 and 2004. The 2001 data benchmark corruption at the time of decentralization, but for a limited sample of districts. We find that corruption declines between 2001 and 2004 overall, but much less [more] so in districts with more secular [Islamic] party representatives in district assemblies. For a larger sample of districts, correspondingly, we find that corruption in 2004 is more in districts which voted more in favor of secular party representatives in the first elections in 1999. We argue that the effects seem to be causal, over above any effects of changing religiosity and economic circumstances across districts.

Joseph C., Gunawan J., Sawani Y., Rahmat M., Noyem J.A., Darus F. A comparative study of anti-corruption practice disclosure among Malaysian and Indonesian corporate social responsibility (CSR) best practice companies. Journal of Cleaner Production. 2016. Vol. 112. Part 4. Pp. 2896-2906.
King D.Y. Corruption in Indonesia: a curable cancer? Journal of International Affairs. 2000. Vol. 53. Iss. 2. Pp. 603-(?).
Kristiansen S., Ramli M. Buying an income: the market for civil service positions in Indonesia. Contemporary Southeast Asia: a Journal of International and Strategic Affairs. Vol. 28. Iss. 2. Pp. 207-233.
Lukito A.S. Fostering and enhancing the role of private sector: a prevention way towards corruption eradication in Indonesia. Journal of Financial Crime. 2015. Vol. 22. Iss. 4. Pp. 476-491.
Mahadwartha P.A. States of nature and indicators of manager’s corruption in Indonesia. Global Journal of Business Research. 2010. Vol. 4. Iss. 3. Pp. 25-45.

This research investigates private sector corruption. The research focuses on a firm’s life cycle as it relates to corruption. Free cash flows to dividends and leverage are used as indicators of private sector corruption. The research examines Non-financial firms listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange from 1994 to 2006 including 1,680 observation years. Six hypotheses are tested using the Generalized Methods of Moments and Wald tests. The results demonstrate that leverage policy is a major indicator of firm micro level corruption while dividend policy is not. The results show maturity stage firms have the highest corruption levels and declining stage firms have the lowest levels.

Maulana A., Situngkir H. Dynamics of the corruption eradication in Indonesia. 2013. Электронный ресурс

The paper discusses an important aspect of the complexity of corruption eradication in Indonesia. Corruption eradication is practically not merely about law enforcement, but also related to social, economic, and political aspects of the nation. By extracting the data from national news media and implement models describing the sentiment relations among political actors, the connection between balance of the sentiment among political elites and the critical levels of the investigation and law enforcement is apparently demonstrated. The focus group discussions among experts, practitioners, and social activists confirm the model. 

McLeod R.H. Inadequate budgets and salaries as instruments for institutionalizing public sector corruption in Indonesia. South East Asia Research. 2008. Vol. 16. Iss. 2. Pp. 199-223.
Olken B.A. Monitoring corruption: evidence from a field experiment in Indonesia. Journal of Political Economy. 2007. Vol. 115. Iss. 2. Pp. 200-249.
Pelizzo R., Ang B. A code of conduct for Indonesia: problems and perspectives. Parliamentary Affairs. 2008. Vol. 61. Iss. 2. Pp. 315-333.

Previous analyses have shown that the success of ethics reforms such as the adoption of codes of ethics and codes of conduct depends on whether legislators have homogeneous ethical standards. In this paper, we discuss why the DPD (upper chamber) and the DPR (lower chamber) of the Indonesian legislature have decided to enact a code of conduct. The paper also presents the results of a survey that we conducted in the Indonesian legislature. Data analysis reveals that the ethical standards of Indonesian legislators are far from being homogeneous. In the final section of the paper we suggest some of the steps that could be taken to hom- ogenise their ethical views before drafting and implementing the code of conduct. 

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