Литература
Выбор по теме
Выбрать все темы
Отменить выбор
Уголовное законодательство о противодействии коррупции
Антикоррупционное декларирование
Регулирование конфликта интересов
Дарение и получение подарков
Работа по совместительству
Вращающаяся дверь
Антикоррупционные органы
Служебные разоблачения
Общие вопросы
Выбор по стране
Выбрать все страны
Отменить выбор
Австралия
Австрия
Аргентина
Армения
Бангладеш
Беларусь
Бельгия
Болгария
Бразилия
Великобритания
Венгрия
Германия
Гонконг (Китай)
Греция
Грузия
Дания
Индия
Индонезия
Ирландия
Испания
Италия
Казахстан
Канада
Кипр
Киргизия
Китай
Латвия
Литва
Мальта
Мексика
Монголия
Нигерия
Нидерланды
Новая Зеландия
Норвегия
Пакистан
Перу
Польша
Португалия
Россия
Румыния
Саудовская Аравия
Сербия
Сингапур
Словакия
Словения
США
Таджикистан
Турция
Украина
Филиппины
Финляндия
Франция
Хорватия
Чехия
Чили
Швейцария
Швеция
Эстония
ЮАР
Южная Корея
Япония
Выбор по дате
Выбрать все года
Отменить выбор
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1998
1996
1992
Сортировка
По алфавиту ↑
По алфавиту ↓
В хронологическом порядке ↑
В хронологическом порядке ↓
Всего найдено: 1541
Общие вопросы
Греция
Danopoulos C.P. The cultural roots of corruption in Greece. Mediterranean Quarterly. 2014. Vol. 25. Iss. 2. Pp. 105-130.
Katsios S. The shadow economy and corruption in Greece. South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics. 2006. Vol. 4. Iss. 1. Pp. 61-80.

The paper highlights the interaction between the underground economy and corruption, focussing on the regional dimensions of the problem in south-eastern Europe. It discusses the theoretical approach to underground economic activities and focuses on the determinants of the Greek economy, the tax and national insurance burdens and the intensity of the relevant regulations in Greece, concluding that Greece shows profound signs of a transition country in terms of the high level of regulation leading to a high incidence of bribery and a large shadow economy. The taxation problems arising from high administrative-compliance costs and bribery indicate the urgent need for tax reforms designed to simplify the regulation framework. Improvement of the quality of Greek institutions and rationalisation of administrative-compliance costs are a prerequisite for successful and urgently needed tax reforms in terms of reducing the overall Greek shadow economy, through the simplification of the regulatory framework. The inability of Greek governments to tax underground activities, and the relevant impact on the scale of corruption, is related with a vast range of governmental activities distorting and weakening its allocative, redistributional and stabilising role. The paper finally argues that the strong and consistent relationship between the shadow economy and corruption in Greece is closely connected with the reflexes of those who are not willing or cannot afford to bribe central or local government bureaucrats, or who have no connections to these bureaucrats, systematically choosing the dark (shadow) side of the economy as a substitute for corruption (bribery) and making the shadow economy complementary to a “corrupt state”. 

Konstantinidis I., Xezonakis G. Sources of tolerance towards corrupted politicians in Greece: the role of trade offs and individual benefits. Crime, Law & Social Change. 2013. Vol. 60. Iss. 5. Pp. 549-563.
Papaconstantinou P., Tsagkanos A.G., Siriopoulos C. How bureaucracy and corruption affect economic growth and convergence in the European Union. The case of Greece. Managerial Finance. 2013. Vol. 39. Iss. 9. Pp. 837-847.

The main purpose of our paper is to study the impact of bureaucracy and corruption on economic development across European Union (EU) core members over the most recent period of time. In addition, based on the neo – classical approach of ‘beta’ convergence and included some structural variables of particular meaning we calculate the exact time of convergence for Greece to the (present) average mean GDP per capita in EU, as well as how this time is affected by one unit improvement in two crucial variables. The results confirm other studies that imply the negative impact of bureaucracy and corruption on economic growth while these are strengthened statistically using a relatively new econometric procedure the Markov Conditional Bootstrap (MCB) that is more accurate than other respective approaches like the Block Bootstrap and the Generalized Method of Moments. Additionally, it is confirmed through Granger causality test a causal relationship from corruption and bureaucracy to economic growth. 

Papastamatelou J. Bestechung und Bestechlichkeit von Amtsträgern in Griechenland: Das “Eindringen” der Korruption in Politik, Justiz und Gesellschaft / Active and passive bribery of state officials in Greece. The “invasion” of corruption in politics, law and society. Monatsschrift fur Kriminologie und Strafrechtsreform. 2012. Vol. 95. Iss. 4. Pp. 281-293. На немецком языке.
Грузия
Aliyev H. The effects of the Saakashvili era reforms on informal practices in the Republic of Georgia. Studies of Transition States & Societies. 2014. Vol. 6. Iss. 1. Pp. 19-33.

 

Since the 2003 Rose Revolution, the Georgian government implemented a number of major institutional reforms which have succeeded in modernising Georgia’s state institutions, reducing corruption and ‘formalising’ the public sector. While the effects of Saakashvili’s reforms on state and institution-building, corruption and the rule of law have been examined by a large and growing body of academic literature, there has been little discussion about the impact of institutional changes on the previously widespread culture of informality in Georgia. This article explores the effects of Georgian institution-building from such aspects of informality as the use of informal networks and connections in exchanges of favours, gift-giving and other types of informal activities. The findings of this study, based on the analysis of recent surveys and in-depth interviews, conclude that the reforms succeeded in undermining the overall importance of informal practices in dealings with state bureaucracy, education system, healthcare, law enforcement, judiciary and some other areas previously dominated by informality. However, the reliance on informality did not disappear, and informal networks are still employed as coping mechanisms and as social safety nets.

Charkvani T. Post-soviet Georgia in the process of transformation-modernization challenges in public service. Romanian Journal of Political Science. 2013. Vol. 13. Iss. 2. Pp. 137-162.
Di Puppo L. Anti-corruption interventions in Georgia. Global Crime. 2010. Vol. 11. Iss. 2. Pp. 220-236.
Di Puppo L. The construction of success in anti-corruption activity in Georgia. East European Politics. 2014. Vol. 30. Iss. 1. Pp. 105-122.

This article examines anti-corruption activities in Georgia after the Rose Revolution of  November 2003 under the administration of Mikheil Saakashvili. It aims to analyse the existence of different assessments on the country’s success in fighting corruption and applies an interpretive framework to study these assessments as “narratives” that reveal the diverging or converging interests of anti-corruption actors in sustaining a common narrative on the country’s reforms.

Kupatadze A. Explaining Georgia’s anti-corruption drive. European Security. 2012. Vol. 21. Iss. 1. Pp. 16-36.

This article explains Georgia’s achievements against rampant corruption that plagued the country for decades. It demonstrates how Georgia has moved from being a ‘failed state’ to the state with low corruption rates following the Rose Revolution of 2003. It is argued that several internal and external drivers motivated Georgian leadership to fight corruption in the post-revolutionary setting, including drawing legitimacy from anti-corruption campaign and using it for political purposes, ‘the West’ as allure and desire to drift away from Russian trajectory of development. 

Lewis M.J., Shacklock A., Connors C.M., Sampford C. Integrity reform in developing countries. Public Integrity. 2013. Vol. 15. Iss. 3. Pp. 243-264.
Light M. Police reforms in the Republic of Georgia: the convergence of domestic and foreign policy in an anti-corruption drive. Policing & Society. 2014. Vol. 24. Iss. 3. Pp. 318-345.

Since the 2003 revolution that brought to power President Mikheil Saakashvili, the post-Soviet Republic of Georgia has implemented a major programme of police reforms, including the mass dismissal of corrupt officers, the restructuring of police agencies, and significant changes in recruitment, training, and compensation. The reforms have eliminated many forms of corruption and have transformed what was a criminalised and dysfunctional police force into the most disciplined and service-oriented law enforcement agency in the post-Soviet region. The paper describes the scope and nature of these police reforms, analyses their effectiveness, and explains their origins. The Saakashvili government implemented police reforms as part of a broader agenda of reversing the decay of the Georgian state in the post-Soviet period and reasserting its control of the national territory and its effective independence from Georgia's neighbour, Russia. Police reforms in Georgia were also the product of a revolutionary moment in which the new government could take extraordinary measures to reshape the police. In part because the Georgian government remains domestically and internationally embattled, the reformed police have become closely associated with the Saakashvili presidency. Georgia therefore suggests that we need to rethink the different ways that democracy and state building contribute to successful police reforms.

Sholderer O. The drivers of police reform: the cases of Georgia and Armenia. CEU Political Science Journal. 2013. Vol. 8. Iss. 3. Pp. 323-347.

This article analyzes cases of police reform aimed at eliminating corruption. It focuses on two cases sharing similar problems of corruption in the past but with different outcomes after undertaking police reform: Georgia and Armenia. It seeks to understand why police reform is more successful in Georgia than in Armenia and uses legal documents, external reports, and secondary literature in this cause. It concludes that the primary factor influencing the outcome is a change in the political elite. Other factors contributing to the outcome of the police reforms were the involvement of foreign actors, the content of the reform, and the magnitude of the corruption.

Баталина А.Л. Инновационные методы противодействия коррупции на примере Эстонии и Грузии. В сборнике: Актуальные проблемы современности. Материалы 6-ой Всероссийской научно-практической конференции «Альтернативный мир». Отв. Ред. Д.В. Буяров. Благовещенск. 2011. С. 9-20.
Иванов А.А. Антикоррупционная политика и правовое регулирование противодействия коррупции в Грузии. Право и современные государства. 2013. № 4. С. 53-59.

В статье рассмотрены вопросы антикоррупционной реформы в Грузии, выявлены правовые основы противодействия коррупции в этом государстве, дана оценка проводимых реформ и их соответствия международным нормам и принципам, проведен анализ мер по оптимизации антикоррупционного механизма в рамках конкретного государства.

1
...
45
46
47
48
49
...
103